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Old 21-12-2010, 07:33 AM   #1
jon
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Default traction problems

Hello everyone. I'm new to the club and I have a few questions regarding a Starlet GT engine install. Is there any traction at all, even with a standard 130HP on tap? I read somewhere about a limited slip diff that's available for the Toyota engine / gearbox install to help with traction. Any ideas if this is available or able to be done?
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Old 21-12-2010, 12:52 PM   #2
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There's a fantastic way to make sure you always get traction, not many people are wise to this... right foot control, use heavy weights and build up the muscles that control the foot, this will allow you to get traction in the toughest of conditions.

oh, and welcome.

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Old 23-12-2010, 05:02 AM   #3
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There is a TRD LSD available but can be quite hard to find. If you can't find one, the best alternative is as mininut said - your right foot (and some softer compound tyres )

On a side note, you may also consider fitting a equalising shaft from a 4AGE (and a custom bracket to hold it onto the block) to get the two outer driveshafts within ~30mm length of each other in an attempt to alleviate torque steer (assuming that the suspension is also set up well)
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Old 23-12-2010, 10:08 PM   #4
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Which 4AGE install had the equaliser shaft? I've fitted one from an MR2 and the driveshafts are 500mm and approx 275mm! Think I'll be heading for the first ditch when I get it on the road.....
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Old 27-12-2010, 09:18 AM   #5
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I have a feeling its the 4agze, or the silvertop 20v.
Not totally sure which, i have mine already.
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Old 28-12-2010, 11:44 AM   #6
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Thanks for the help guys, I like the right foot control idea
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Old 11-05-2011, 06:15 AM   #7
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I get plenty of traction on low boost ~150HP/10psi

Quaife LSD, 10" A032R's - good wheel alignment

Traction becomes an issue at higher boost levels..16-22psi but right foot control helps.

My aftermarket computer is also setup for gear/speed boost control so that as the speed increases and gear we can ramp the boost up to take advantage of the extra traction. This is a lot of work to setup properly though.
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Old 04-08-2011, 07:00 AM   #8
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I also swapt my mini GT engine with 4EFTE engine, when kick down the front body lifthing so it change all the chamber and the car is uncontrolable. Later I tight the lower arm so the the lifth can only to a certain level, but this is the dummy process and I wonder if anyone facing the same problem for the front body lifthing due to strong engine power.
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Old 04-08-2011, 07:51 AM   #9
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Yes, the front of the car will lift under heavy acceleration.

There are a couple of things you can do - raise the rear of the car and you can also put in hydro competition rear bumpstops - which helps stop the squat at the rear.
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Old 04-08-2011, 06:29 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by minisprouts View Post
I also swapt my mini GT engine with 4EFTE engine, when kick down the front body lifthing so it change all the chamber and the car is uncontrolable. Later I tight the lower arm so the the lifth can only to a certain level, but this is the dummy process and I wonder if anyone facing the same problem for the front body lifthing due to strong engine power.
limit straps will stop the lift, but will redice traction and mask the inherent problem. you need to reduce or eliminate bump steer.
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Old 05-08-2011, 03:33 AM   #11
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What are limit straps? where/how do you install them? Any Pics?

What are the trade-offs?
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Old 07-08-2011, 07:08 PM   #12
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there not a good idea, they will reduce traction, and they only mask an underlying problem
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Old 19-12-2012, 07:17 AM   #13
Kingsley Aghedo
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Reversing the fork actually makes the handling more stable but it makes the bike feel sluggish when turning. I've ridden my Bike Friday with a reversed fork and the main problem was that the bike was much more prone to lifting the rear wheel under hard braking. I agree with the choice to move the battery weight to the front instead, especially if you can mount it fairly low. Traction is primarily a function of the weight on the wheel and the tire compound. There shouldn't be a need to go with a bigger, lower pressure tire.
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Old 19-12-2012, 09:03 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kingsley Aghedo View Post
Reversing the fork actually makes the handling more stable but it makes the bike feel sluggish when turning. I've ridden my Bike Friday with a reversed fork and the main problem was that the bike was much more prone to lifting the rear wheel under hard braking. I agree with the choice to move the battery weight to the front instead, especially if you can mount it fairly low. Traction is primarily a function of the weight on the wheel and the tire compound. There shouldn't be a need to go with a bigger, lower pressure tire.
Did you copy and paste that straight off the internet its a car forum and although i haven't clicked the links on your post i bet its selling some bananase The post is very old as well.

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